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Debate: War on Drugs

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====Yes==== ====Yes====
-|width="45%" bgcolor="#F2FAFB" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|+Just becuase youth are under 21, this doesn't mean they should have priveleges of getting away with crimes. Drugs are illegal and they should be punished equally for using them.
 +If they are not punished, then they'll keep using them even though they probably know they are bad for them.
====No==== ====No====

Revision as of 06:38, 9 March 2008

Is the American War on Drugs succeeding or should it be abandoned?

Contents

Background and Context of Debate:

Supply/demand/prices: Has the War on Drugs reduced the supply of illegal drugs?

Yes

  • The War on Drugs has caused the price of many illicit drugs to increase - This is seen as a sign of success because it suggests that the supply of drugs has diminished as a result of such things as coca field eradication in Columbia. In general, the diminished supply of a good makes the good more scarce and more valuable or expensive on the market. Since the price of cocaine has increased, therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that a decrease in supply is the result.



No

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Imprisonment: Is the imprisonment rate in the War on Drugs justifiable?

Yes

No

  • The incarceration rate in America's war on drugs is excessive and costly. Between 1983 and 1998, annual drug admissions to state and federal prisons increased approximately 16-fold to about 170,000.[1] Mike Gravel. 2006 - "The United States incarcerates more people and at a higher rate than any other peacetime nation in the world. According to the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics the number of US residents behind bars has now reached more than 2.3 million. We are losing an entire generation of young men and women to our prisons. Our nation's ineffective and wasteful 'war on drugs' plays a major role in this. We must place a greater emphasis on rehabilitation and prevention. We must de-criminalize minor drug offenses and increase the availability and visibility of substance abuse treatment and prevention in our communities as well as in jails and prisons."



Civil liberties: Are civil liberties protected adequately in the War on Drugs?

Yes

No


Youth drug problems:

Yes

Just becuase youth are under 21, this doesn't mean they should have priveleges of getting away with crimes. Drugs are illegal and they should be punished equally for using them.

If they are not punished, then they'll keep using them even though they probably know they are bad for them.

No

  • Youth and students with drug problems should be helped off of their addictions, not punished.
    • Scarlett Swerdlow, Executive Director of Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP) said in 2005[2] - "Half of all high school seniors graduating this year have tried illegal drugs at some point. More than eight in ten say it’s easy for them to get their hands on marijuana. Drug policies should take this reality into account and respond sensibly. But instead, the Drug Czar wants to alienate students who have problems with drugs by arresting them, kicking them out of extracurricular activities, and taking away their financial aid for college."



Write Subquestion here...

Yes


No


Leaders/politicians: Where do the primary leaders and politicians stands?

Yes

  • Bush administration.
  • Drug Czar John Walters,
  • Robert Novak, architect of Plan Columbia.


No



Organizations pro and con:

Yes

  • Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) - Cited increase in cocaine prices in 2006 as evidence of success.[3]



No

  • Drug Policy Alliance.
  • Government Accountability Office.
  • Students for Sensible Drug Policy.
  • DrugWarRant.com
  • Human Rights Watch, opposes the War on Drugs largely on the basis of the incarceration costs.



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