Personal tools
 
Views

Debate: Lobbying

From Debatepedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 16:58, 20 January 2010 (edit)
Brooks Lindsay (Talk | contribs)
(Pro)
← Previous diff
Revision as of 19:42, 20 January 2010 (edit)
Lenkahabetinova (Talk | contribs)
(background section, ToC)
Next diff →
Line 8: Line 8:
|- |-
|bgcolor="#F7F7F7" colspan="2" style= "border:1px solid #BAC5FD"| |bgcolor="#F7F7F7" colspan="2" style= "border:1px solid #BAC5FD"|
 +===Background and context===
 +
 +
 +|}
 +
 +{| style="width:100%; height:100px" border="0" align="center"
 +|__TOC__
 +|}
 +
 +{|
 +|-
 +{|style="font-size:100%; padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;" cellpadding="5"
 +
 +|-
 +|colspan="2" width="45%" bgcolor="#F2F2F2" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|
 +
=== Free speech: Is lobbying a natural extension of free speech? === === Free speech: Is lobbying a natural extension of free speech? ===
Line 111: Line 127:
|colspan="2" width="45%" bgcolor="#F2F2F2" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"| |colspan="2" width="45%" bgcolor="#F2F2F2" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|
==See also== ==See also==
-==External links==+==External links and resources==
|} |}

Revision as of 19:42, 20 January 2010

Is lobbying a legitimate practice? What are the pros and cons?

Background and context

Contents

Free speech: Is lobbying a natural extension of free speech?

Pro

  • Lobbying is an expression of freedom of speech. The First Amendment of the United States Constitution, for example, states: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." Lobbying is a natural expression of these rights, giving voice to the opinions and desires of organized groups such as businesses, advocacy groups, and unions.
  • Lobbying is routed in historic democratic principles. Tom Korologos. "In Defense of Lobbyists." Wall Street Journal. May 30, 2008: "The concept of entitling citizens to petition their government did not originate with the authors of the Constitution. It was the product of centuries of Western political thought. [...] The Athenians of the 6th century B.C. instituted the right of an aggrieved party to have a case pleaded before the state by a third party. The Magna Carta included the right of the country's nobility to petition the throne. Christopher Columbus lobbied Isabella for the appropriations (probably the first U.S.-related earmark) for the boats to undertake his historic voyage."

Con

Click on the pencil icon and research and write arguments here





Corporate lobbying: Is corporate lobbying defensible?

Pro

  • Why should corporate lobbying be bad and other forms good. Tom Korologos. "In Defense of Lobbyists." Wall Street Journal. May 30, 2008: "why do the pundits, political operatives and segments of the media look with suspicion on advocacy? Isn't everyone entitled to have his or her voice heard? Why should lobbying by Boeing or the American Petroleum Institute be bad and lobbying by the Friends of the Earth or the National Education Association pristine? Or lobbying by the National Association of Manufacturers or Chamber of Commerce unsavory, but lobbying by the Laborers International Union and AFL-CIO virtuous?"


Con

Click on the pencil icon and research and write arguments here





Corruption: Is corruption not unique to lobbying?

Pro

  • Corruption exists equally in lobbying as other professions. Tom Korologos. "In Defense of Lobbyists." Wall Street Journal. May 30, 2008: "'Jack Abramoff! Jack Abramoff!' is now the catch-phrase invoked by our friendly 'reformers.' No one will defend Abramoff's gross transgressions, but we need a new yardstick. Should we now start listing members of Congress who have abused their authority in the last decade alone? Or compile a similar list of judges, bankers, mortgage brokers, cops and rapacious corporate executives? The central point is that there are no more (nor fewer) lobbyists who have 'crossed the line' than from any other walk of life."


Con

Click on the pencil icon and research and write arguments here





Write Subquestion here...

Pro

  • Almost every single sector is represented by lobbyists. Tom Korologos. "In defense of lobbyists." Wall Street Journal. May 30, 2008: "There are now more than 35,000 registered lobbyists in Washington. We are represented from the cradle to the grave. There is a pediatric doctor lobby and a casket manufacturers' lobby. A to Z? Just look and you will find an asphalt lobby and a zipper lobby. Soup to nuts? Campbell's and Planters are here for the looking. I can't think of a single sector of the American economy that directly or indirectly doesn't have some sort of Washington representation. And that's good for the Republic."


Con

Pro/con sources:

Pro

Con

See also

External links and resources

Problem with the site? 

Tweet a bug on bugtwits
.