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Debate: Hydrogen vehicles

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What are the pros and cons of hydrogen vehicles for consumers and government?

Contents

Background and Context of Debate:

Global warming: Will hydrogen vehicles help solve global warming?

Yes

  • Hydrogen produces no pollution/greenhouse-gases "at the tailpipe". Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles produce only water as a waste byproduct from the exhaust pipe.
  • Hydrogen produced from coal-electricity is still cleaner than gasoline. Some argue that it is no better to produce hydrogen fuel cells from electricity that is "dirty", such as coal-generated electricity. Yet, even if coal was the only source of electricity production (which it is not), hydrogen would still be cleaner than gasoline cars. The reason is primarily that it is more efficient to burn coal on a massive scale to generate electricity for vehicles than it is to burn gasoline on a micro-scale in individual vehicles. The later releases more emissions.
  • Electricity for hydrogen production is getting cleaner. From an environmental and global warming standpoint, it is a good idea to move onto the electric grid for all of our energy because most future "green" energy will produce electricity. Nuclear, solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, wave, and tidal energy all produce electricity as their consumable energy product. By relying on electricity, hydrogen fuel cells will become increasingly clean as society transitions to these cleaner sources of electricity production.
  • It is OK to put more energy into making hydrogen than is obtained out. Wayne Cunningham. "Driving It. Why Hydrogen will fuel future cars." CNET. 11 Apr. 2007 - "The most common way to produce hydrogen is electrolysis, running a current through water and causing the hydrogen molecules to separate from the oxygen molecules. Critics point out that it takes more electricity to create the hydrogen then it will generate in a fuel cell. While that is true, it also takes energy to create a gallon of gasoline. Oil has to be pumped, transported, and refined."


No

  • Hydrogen vehicles will arrive too late to help global warming. A National Research Council report that pegs 2020 for the arrival of the mass-market fuel cell vehicle. According to USA Today, "That's the best case scenario, of course, assuming technology, government, industry and the public all cooperate on bringing hydrogen cars to the nation's highways."[1] Yet, the IPCC says that steps must be taken immediately to stop global warming. This means that hydrogen fuel cell technology is out of sink with the immediacy required in solving global warming.
  • Hydrogen is only as clean as the electricity producing it Producing hydrogen requires energy. Some or even all of that energy comes from burning fossil fuels, particularly coal. In the United States, for instance, over 50% of all electricity is generated by burning coal, which is a major contributor to global warming.
  • Some methods strip hydrogen from Methane, releasing CO2. Arthur St. Antoine. "Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Reality". Motor Trend. - "of the nine million tons of hydrogen currently produced in the U.S. each year, 95 percent is generated using steam and heat to strip hydrogen atoms off methane gas. This process produces carbon dioxide (CO2), as do all similar methods of reforming coal and other hydrocarbons."
  • Leaked hydrogen damages the environment like chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). A study from the California Institute of Technology says it is likely that mass-produced hydrogen will leak, which would be very damaging to the environment, because hydrogen destroys ozone in the same way that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) do.


Economics: Are hydrogen fuel cells economical?

Yes

  • Mass-produced hydrogen vehicles will not be expensive. Wayne Cunningham. "Driving It. Why Hydrogen will fuel future cars." CNET. 11 Apr. 2007 - "Many articles I've read covering specific fuel cell cars point out the cost of the car, usually in the millions of dollars. But this dollar figure has no relation to any hydrogen fuel cell production vehicle that will eventually be offered for sale. These research cars are hand-built and use experimental technology created in limited amounts. The most expensive material used in these cars is the platinum covering the nodes in the fuel cells. Other than that, the car consists of motors, wheels, a frame, and body. And there are even fuel cells under development using different, cheaper materials."
  • Hydrogen is the most abundant substance in the universe.
  • Hydrogen has more energy per weight than any other fuel.


No

  • Hydrogen is not readily available for use on Earth. "So far, hydrogen-powered cars are fuel for future thoughts". USA Today. 21 July 2008 - "Unfortunately there is no readily available source of molecular hydrogen (H2) to be found on our planet. There is lots of hydrogen, but it is found as part of larger molecules, most commonly water or hydrocarbons. To be able to use hydrogen in a fuel cell, those hydrogen atoms must be stripped from hydrocarbons and reformed into H2 or electrically disassociated from oxygen in water."
  • Hydrogen cars are very expensive. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "your average hydrogen car costs a million dollars. that's gotta drop [in order for hydrogen vehicles to be viable in the market place."
  • Hydrogen fuel is very expensive. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "[hydrogen] fuel is wildly expensive. Even hydrogen from dirty fossil fuels is two or three times more expensive than gasoline."
  • Hydrogen fuel is a weak energy source by volume.


Infrastructure: Is a hydrogen fuel cell infrastructure possible?

Yes

No

  • Hydrogen cars would need a new fueling infrastructure. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "you have to have the fueling infrastructure. We have 183,000 gas stations someone's gonna have to build at least 10,000 or 20,000 hydrogen fueling stations before anybody is gonna be very interested."

Storage: Can hydrogen fuel be effectively stored in cars?

Yes

  • Hydrogen fuel-cell cars are really electric cars. Wayne Cunningham. "Driving It. Why Hydrogen will fuel future cars." 11 Apr. 2007 - "Every major automaker has a fuel cell research car that works. I've driven many of them, and the driving experience is very good. A fuel cell car is really just an electric car that powers its motors from a fuel cell. The fuel cell takes hydrogen and combines it with oxygen to make water, H2O. The byproduct of this process is electricity, which gets fed to the motors. Most importantly, the electrical output of a fuel cell pack is strong enough to give an electric car reasonable acceleration."


No

  • Hydrogen can't be compress to give give sufficient range. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "No known material to human kind can store enough hydrogen on the car to give you the range people want."

Safety: Are hydrogen fuel cell vehicles safe?

Yes

  • Hydrogen in cars is less dangerous than gasoline. Wayne Cunningham. "Driving It. Why Hydrogen will fuel future cars." CNET. 11 Apr. 2007 - "Fuel cell critics point out that hydrogen is flammable, but so is gasoline. Unlike gasoline, which can pool up and burn for a long time, hydrogen dissipates rapidly. Gas tanks tend to be easily punctured, thin-walled containers, while the latest hydrogen tanks are made from Kevlar. Also, gaseous hydrogen isn't the only method of storage under consideration--BMW is looking at liquid storage while other researchers are looking at chemical compound storage, such as boron pellets."


No

  • Hydrogen is very flammable, so presents dangers. Patrick J Coyle. "The Hydrogen Debate Continues". Suite 101. 9 Jul. 2007 - "Hydrogen is a light, very flammable gas. It burns at a much wider range of concentrations in the atmosphere than propane (Wald), and requires less energy to ignite. This means that hydrogen is much more likely to catch fire than are hydrocarbon fuels currently in use."


Vs. electric: Is hydrogen superior to electric vehicles?

Yes

  • Hydrogen cars are essentially high-performance electric cars. Wayne Cunningham. "Driving It. Why Hydrogen will fuel future cars." CNET. 11 Apr. 2007 - "It's important to keep in mind that a fuel cell car is just an electric car that happens to derive its electricity from a hydrogen-oxygen reaction. Any other source of electricity could work. The reason that automakers are focusing on hydrogen is because they find it the most practical solution for achieving the performance we've come to expect from our cars."


No

  • Hydrogen cars cannot be charged at home like electric cars.
  • Hydrogen is more challenging than the primary alternatives. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "Hydrogen is a much tougher alternative fuel than any other alternative fuel we've ever pursued."
  • Hydrogen is only an interim solution to better electric batteries. In an article from Automotive Engineering International, Volkswagen's Professor Jurgen Leohold sees hydrogen fuel cells as being an interim solution. The long-term solution, according to Professor Leohold is better batteries that could run a car for 350 miles and be recharged in five minutes. When these batteries exist, hydrogen will be entirely unecessary. And, these batteries do already exist, although at a high price. It will not be long, however, before prices come down.


Vs. hybrids: How do hydrogen fuel cell cars compare to hybrid vehicles?

Yes

No

  • Hybrids will always outshine hydrogen cars. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "Miracle 5 is you have to hope an pray the competitors in the market place don't get any better because right now the best car in the market place just got a lot better. The hybrid vehicle. Still runs on gasoline you can fuel it anywhere. It has twice the range of a regular car. And if battery technology keeps getting steadily better than the best hybrid and then plug-in hybrid in the year 2020 will be vastly superior to the best hydrogen car."


Pro/con resources:

Yes


No

External links

See also

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