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Debate: Hydrogen vehicles

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-*'''Hydrogen is very flammable, so presents dangers.''' "Hydrogen is a light, very flammable gas. It burns at a much wider range of concentrations in the atmosphere than propane (Wald), and requires less energy to ignite. This means that hydrogen is much more likely to catch fire than are hydrocarbon fuels currently in use."+*'''Hydrogen is very flammable, so presents dangers.''' ''Patrick J Coyle. "The Hydrogen Debate Continues". Suite 101. 9 Jul. 2007'' - "Hydrogen is a light, very flammable gas. It burns at a much wider range of concentrations in the atmosphere than propane (Wald), and requires less energy to ignite. This means that hydrogen is much more likely to catch fire than are hydrocarbon fuels currently in use."
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===Vs. electric: Is hydrogen superior to electric vehicles? === ===Vs. electric: Is hydrogen superior to electric vehicles? ===

Revision as of 04:03, 2 September 2008

What are the pros and cons of hydrogen vehicles for consumers and government?

Contents

Background and Context of Debate:

Global warming: Will hydrogen vehicles help solve global warming?

Yes

  • 0-emission energy sources can power production of hydrogen. "So far, hydrogen-powered cars are fuel for future thoughts". USA Today. 21 July 2008 - "While fossil fuels might be burned to produce much of the energy required for hydrogen production, some electricity would also come from burning biomass or from solar, wind and hydroelectric generation. Generally, these non-fossil fuel power sources are becoming a larger part of the electrical power generation grid and should eventually supplant fossil fuels."


No

  • Hydrogen vehicles will arrive too late to help global warming. A National Research Council report that pegs 2020 for the arrival of the mass-market fuel cell vehicle. According to USA Today, "That's the best case scenario, of course, assuming technology, government, industry and the public all cooperate on bringing hydrogen cars to the nation's highways."[1] Yet, the IPCC says that steps must be taken immediately to stop global warming. This means that hydrogen fuel cell technology is out of sink with the immediacy required in solving global warming.
  • Too much energy is required in producing hydrogen. "So far, hydrogen-powered cars are fuel for future thoughts". USA Today. 21 July 2008 - "According to Frank Kreith (J. of Energy Resources Technology, December 2004) more energy is required to produce the hydrogen fuel than is available from 'burning' that hydrogen in a fuel cell. Substantially more electricity could be produced by burning the hydrocarbon in a conventional electric utility than could be produced in a fuel cell from the same material converted to hydrogen; too many conversion steps in the hydrogen production process."
  • Producing hydrogen often requires burning fossil fuels. Producing hydrogen requires energy. Some or even all of that energy comes from burning fossil fuels. This is obviously bad for global warming.


Economics: Are hydrogen fuel cells economical?

Yes

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No

  • Hydrogen is not readily available for use on Earth. "So far, hydrogen-powered cars are fuel for future thoughts". USA Today. 21 July 2008 - "Unfortunately there is no readily available source of molecular hydrogen (H2) to be found on our planet. There is lots of hydrogen, but it is found as part of larger molecules, most commonly water or hydrocarbons. To be able to use hydrogen in a fuel cell, those hydrogen atoms must be stripped from hydrocarbons and reformed into H2 or electrically disassociated from oxygen in water."
  • Hydrogen cars are very expensive. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "your average hydrogen car costs a million dollars. that's gotta drop [in order for hydrogen vehicles to be viable in the market place."
  • Hydrogen fuel is very expensive. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "[hydrogen] fuel is wildly expensive. Even hydrogen from dirty fossil fuels is two or three times more expensive than gasoline."


Infrastructure: Is a hydrogen fuel cell infrastructure possible?

Yes

No

  • Hydrogen cars would need a new fueling infrastructure. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "you have to have the fueling infrastructure. We have 183,000 gas stations someone's gonna have to build at least 10,000 or 20,000 hydrogen fueling stations before anybody is gonna be very interested."

Storage: Can hydrogen fuel be effectively stored in cars?

Yes

No

  • Hydrogen can't be compress to give give sufficient range. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "No known material to human kind can store enough hydrogen on the car to give you the range people want."

Safety: Are hydrogen fuel cell vehicles safe?

Yes

No

  • Hydrogen is very flammable, so presents dangers. Patrick J Coyle. "The Hydrogen Debate Continues". Suite 101. 9 Jul. 2007 - "Hydrogen is a light, very flammable gas. It burns at a much wider range of concentrations in the atmosphere than propane (Wald), and requires less energy to ignite. This means that hydrogen is much more likely to catch fire than are hydrocarbon fuels currently in use."


Vs. electric: Is hydrogen superior to electric vehicles?

Yes

No

  • Hydrogen cars cannot be charged at home like electric cars.
  • Hydrogen is more challenging than the primary alternatives. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "Hydrogen is a much tougher alternative fuel than any other alternative fuel we've ever pursued."

Vs. hybrids: How do hydrogen fuel cell cars compare to hybrid vehicles?

Yes

No

  • Hybrids will always outshine hydrogen cars. Joseph J. Romm, author of "The hype about hydrogen", said in the movie "Who killed the electric car" (2006), "Miracle 5 is you have to hope an pray the competitors in the market place don't get any better because right now the best car in the market place just got a lot better. The hybrid vehicle. Still runs on gasoline you can fuel it anywhere. It has twice the range of a regular car. And if battery technology keeps getting steadily better than the best hybrid and then plug-in hybrid in the year 2020 will be vastly superior to the best hydrogen car."


Pro/con resources:

Yes


No

External links

See also

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