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Debate: Corporal punishment of children

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ROBERT SUCK EVERYBODYS DICK ROBERT SUCK EVERYBODYS DICK
WHO EVER READ THIS IS THE GAYESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIITTTTTTTTTTTTTCCCCCCCCCCHHHHHHHHHHH (BITCH) WHO EVER READ THIS IS THE GAYESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIITTTTTTTTTTTTTCCCCCCCCCCHHHHHHHHHHH (BITCH)
 +===Physical damage: Can corporal punishment cause physical damage? ===
 +|-
 +|width="45%" bgcolor="#FFFAE0" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|
 +====Pro====
 +*'''Physical injuries only occur in abusive corporal punishment.''' Serious physical injuries only occur where disciplined, strategic corporal punishment becomes child abuse. There is a strict line between the two (see above) and to ignore it is deliberately misleading.
 +
 +*'''[[Argument: Corporal punishment does not foster violent tendencies|Corporal punishment does not foster violent tendencies]]'''.
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 +|width="45%" bgcolor="#F2FAFB" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|
 +====Con====
 +
 +*'''[[Argument: Corporal punishment can cause serious physical damage| Corporal punishment can cause serious physical damage]]''' The actual physical damage inflicted via corporal punishment on children can be horrifying. Examples can be found of students needing treatment for broken arms, nerve and muscle damage, and cerebral haemorrhage. Spanking of the buttocks can cause damage to the sciatic nerve and therefore the leg to which it leads.
 +
 +|-
 +|colspan="2" width="45%" bgcolor="#F2F2F2" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|
 +===Sexual abuse: Is corporal punishment associated with sexual abuse?===
 +
 +|-
 +|width="45%" bgcolor="#FFFAE0" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|
 +====Pro====
 +
 +*'''[[Argument: Sexual abuse is insufficient to ban corporal punishment|Risks of sexual abuse with spanking can be regulated]].''' [http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb6395/is_1998_Summer/ai_n28716074/?tag=rbxcra.2.a.43 David Benatar. "Corporal Punishment Social Theory and Practice". Social Theory and Practice. Summer 1998]: "It is, of course, a concern that some parents or teachers might derive sexual gratification from beating children, but is it a reason to eliminate or ban the practice? Someone might suggest that it is, if the anticipated sexual pleasure led to beatings that were inappropriate--either because children were beaten when they should not have been, or if the punishment were administered in an improper manner. However, if this is the concern, surely the fitting response would be to place limitations on the use of the punishment and, at least in schools, to monitor and enforce compliance."
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 +|width="45%" bgcolor="#F2FAFB" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|
 +====Con====
 +
 +*'''[[Argument: Corporal punishment on the buttocks is a sexual violation| Corporal punishment on the buttocks is a sexual violation]]''' [http://www.religioustolerance.org/spankin4.htm Child Corporal Punishment: The anti-spanking position"]: "Slapping or any other type of force used on the buttocks is a sexual violation: The buttocks are an erogenous zone of the human body. Their nerve system is connected to the body's sexual nerve centers. Slapping them can involuntarily trigger feelings of sexual pleasure which become mixed with the pain. This can lead to confusion in the child's mind which influences the way in which they express their sexuality as adults."
 +
 +
 +|-
 +|colspan="2" width="45%" bgcolor="#F2F2F2" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top:0.5em;"|
===Last resort: Is corporal punishment justified as "a last resort"? === ===Last resort: Is corporal punishment justified as "a last resort"? ===

Revision as of 18:25, 16 March 2011

Background and context

This debate shares something with Corporal Punishment (for Adults), namely whether the infliction of physical pain can ever be justifiable;
but the issue of ‘paddling’ or spanking for children is less about punishment in itself and more about punishment as a means of education. How can young children learn the difference between right and wrong? How can teachers establish order in the classroom and enable a better environment for learning? Britain is a major example in this debate, having allowed corporal punishment in classrooms until 1986 when legislation brought it in line with the rest of Europe. All industrialised countries now ban corporal punishment in schools (not parental spanking) apart from the USA, Canada and one state in Australia.

See Wikipedia: corporal punishment for more background.

Contents

Discipline: Can corporal punishment help discipline children?

fuck everybody who loves corporal punishment its for loses and sex prediters who love to look at little kids ass



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Physical damage: Can corporal punishment cause physical damage?

Pro

  • Physical injuries only occur in abusive corporal punishment. Serious physical injuries only occur where disciplined, strategic corporal punishment becomes child abuse. There is a strict line between the two (see above) and to ignore it is deliberately misleading.


Con

  • Corporal punishment can cause serious physical damage The actual physical damage inflicted via corporal punishment on children can be horrifying. Examples can be found of students needing treatment for broken arms, nerve and muscle damage, and cerebral haemorrhage. Spanking of the buttocks can cause damage to the sciatic nerve and therefore the leg to which it leads.

Sexual abuse: Is corporal punishment associated with sexual abuse?

Pro

Con


Last resort: Is corporal punishment justified as "a last resort"?

Pro


Con

  • Better ways exist; corporal punishment is lazy way There are always ways to discipline children that do not involve violence, and which are inherently superior than resorting to violence. Resorting to violence is the lazy way out for parent or teachers.

Regulation: Can corporal punishment be properly regulated?

Pro

  • Corporal punishment can be regulated within orderly framework. Corporal punishment must be used as part of a wider strategy and at the correct time: when other immediate discipline has failed; when the child understands their behaviour and has had an opportunity to explain it; and after an initial warning and opportunity for the child to repent. Crucially, the person delivering the punishment must not be angry at the time. This undermines much of the hysterical argument against corporal punishment.


Con

  • Regulation of corporal punishment does not soften ill effects. No matter how orderly you make the beating of a child, there are a number of adverse effects. They will lose trust in the adults who administer the beating; they learn that force is an acceptable factor in human interaction; they feel humiliated and lose self-respect; and they build up resentment that cannot be resolved at the time but may lead to severe misbehaviour in the future.


Psychology: Does corporal punishment increase rates of depression/suicide?

Pro

  • Moderate corporal punishment is not psychologically damaging David Benatar. "Corporal Punishment Social Theory and Practice". Social Theory and Practice. Summer 1998: "[Claim:] Corporal punishment is psychologically damaging [...] Although there is evidence that excessive corporal punishment can significantly increase the chances of such psychological harm, most of the psychological data are woefully inadequate to the task of demonstrating that mild and infrequent corporal punishment has such consequences. [...] First, the studies are not conclusive. The main methodological problem is that the studies are not experiments but post facto investigations based on self-reports. [...] The second point is that even if Professor Straus's findings are valid, the nature of the data is insufficiently marked to justify a moral condemnation of mild and infrequent corporal punishment."

Con

  • Corporal punishment increases depression and suicide Murray Straus, an influential researcher on violence at the University of New Hampshire's Family Research Lab, writes in his book Beating the Devil out of Them, that corporal punishment increases rates of depression and suicide.[2]
  • Corporal punishment fosters criminality and delinquency. Dr. Ralph Welsh, who has given psychological exams to over 2,000 delinquents has said: "...it is now apparent that the recidivist male delinquent who was never struck with a belt, board, extension cord, fist, or an equivalent is virtually nonexistent. Even after 10 years, the full impact of this discovery is still difficult to comprehend."

Teacher authority: Does corporal punishment represent a failure of teacher authority?

Pro

  • Corporal punishment does not represent teacher failures David Benatar. "Corporal Punishment Social Theory and Practice". Social Theory and Practice. Summer 1998: "there is a big difference between [...] a failure in the pupil, and a failure in the teacher. In either case it is true, in some sense, that the teacher failed to discourage the child from doing wrong--failed to prevent failure in the child. However, it is not a failure for which the teacher necessarily is responsible. I am well aware that the responsibility for children's wrongdoing is all too often placed exclusively at the door of children themselves, without due attention to the influences to which they are subjected. However, there is a danger that in rejecting this incorrect evaluation, teachers (and parents) will be blamed for all shortcomings in children."
  • Corporal punishment helps protect teachers and adults Walter Williams. "Making a Case for Corporal Punishment". Bnet. Sept 13, 1999: "During my youth, I might have been doing something mischievous, such as throwing stones. An adult would come over to me and ask, 'Does your mother know you're out here throwing stones?' I'd reply, 'No sir or no ma'am,' and hope that the matter ended there. [...] Today, it's quite different. An adult correcting a youngster risks being cursed and possibly assaulted. That's a sad commentary. Adults are justifiably afraid of children. Do we Americans as parents, teachers, principals and others in positions of authority have the guts and willpower to control our youngsters?"


Con

  • Corporal punishment distracts from teaching and training. Bill Gothard: "We don't focus on corporal punishment. We focus on teaching and training."[5]


Generations: What about people that were spanked, but "turned out fine"?

Pro

  • Generations of people have been subjected to corporal punishment. People have been subjected to corporal punishment for years and have turned out just fine. Individuals of all types in society continually give testimony to their own happy and disciplined lives, following corporal punishment as children, and there is no reason to doubt the validity of these claims. Indeed, if someone was spanked as a child and turned out more disciplined, successful, and happy as a result - even if only according to their own interpretations - who is to say that their judgment to deal with their kids in similar ways is invalid. How can the government restrict their right to exercise this judgment and what they see as within the interests of their children.

Con

  • People "doing fine" after corporal punishment were harmed Laurie A. Couture. "Argument #1: "It didn't do ME any harm!". Child Advocate.org.: "Answer: Often people who declare this typical argument do so very defensively. They may feel they must defend the actions of their caretakers. To do otherwise is to admit that as children, they never deserved to have pain inflicted upon them. They must also admit to the feelings of fear, anger and mistrust that may have resulted from being hit by loved ones who were supposed to keep them safe from harm. Often, people who use this argument use or have used corporal punishment on their own children, thus defending their actions to minimize guilt. However, their actions reveal that corporal punishment DID do them harm: It perpetuated the cycle of violence that they now endorse or inflict upon children."


International law: Is corporal punishment consistent with international law?

Pro

  • Corporal punishment is an issue for national not international law. Corporal punishment is an issue that is sensitive to individual cultures in different countries around the world. For this reason, it is wrong to apply international law at the expense of national law. Each nation must make this judgement based on public feelings regarding the practice, as this is one of the more important elements in whether it can be deemed acceptable or not. Like many moral issues, there is not blanket answer, and it is important to defer to local populations' interpretation of morality and culture to determine the appropriate public policy and law.

Con

  • Corporal punishment is illegal under international law. Article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child Article clearly prohibits any physical violence or punishment against children, which includes corporal punishment: "States Parties shall take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and education measures to protect the child from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse, while in the care of parent(s), legal guardian(s) or any other person who has the care of the child. Such protective measures should, as appropriate, include effective procedures for the establishment of social programs to provide necessary support for the child and for those who have the care of the child, as well as for other forms of prevention and for identification, reporting, referral, investigation, treatment and follow-up of instances of child maltreatment described heretofore, and, as appropriate, for judicial involvement."[6]

Religion: Is corporal punishment justifiable under religious doctrine?

Pro

  • Quotations from the Bible that promote corporal punishment.
    • Proverbs 23:14. The authorship is traditionally attributed to King Solomon: "Thou shalt beat him with the rod, and shalt deliver his soul from hell."
    • "He who spareth his rod hateth his son, but he who loveth him is chasteneth him betimes." (King Solomon, in the Book of Proverbs [13:24].
    • "Foolishness is bound up in the heart of a child; The rod of correction will drive it far from him." (Proverbs 22:15)
    • "Do not withhold correction from a child, for if you beat him with a rod, he will not die. You shall beat him with a rod. And deliver his soul from hell." (Proverbs 23:13)



Con

  • Scripture can be cited to enforce or debunk corporal punishment. "The Devil can cite Scripture for his purpose." [Shakespeare] The Bible frequently condones practices that are outrageous to the modern sensibility. It sometimes promotes what would appear to be retribution or wanton acts of violence, while at other times it promotes a more Jesus-like philosophy of complete non-violence and compassion. So, while there are passage in the Bible that give support to corporal punishment, there are also ones that clearly condemn it. For this reason, little value should be assigned to individual passages in the Bible as they relate to corporal punishment.


Pro/con sources

Pro


Con

See also

External links

Books

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