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Argument: Markets efficiently reduce emissions; fuel standards are unnecessary

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Supporting quotations

Dan Carney. "Why U.S. fuel-economy standards don't work". MSNBC. 4 Oct. 2007 - While tougher fuel-economy requirements, known as CAFE standards, could force manufacturers to offer efficient cars such as the Mazda6 wagon, it can’t force consumers to buy them. During the Cold War, we ridiculed the Soviet Union’s command economy for attempting such absurd mandates. In Friedman's column, he claims that European countries and Japan have successfully applied such policies to drive sales of more fuel-efficient cars, but that is flagrantly untrue.


Mike Allen. "Why the New 35-MPG Fuel Economy Standard Is a Bad Idea". Popular Mechanics. 7 Dec. 2007 - "the pressures of the marketplace and the laws of physics may be the only way to get people to buy smaller cars...When gas is more expensive, the marketplace will realign the mix of vehicles on the road, as it has in Europe and most of the rest of the world, where gasoline can cost double what it does here. We just haven’t reached that point yet."

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