Personal tools
 
Views

Argument: Coyotes will respond to a border fence with innovative new ways to cross

From Debatepedia

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 23:48, 18 January 2008 (edit)
Brooks Lindsay (Talk | contribs)

← Previous diff
Current revision (23:48, 18 January 2008) (edit)
Brooks Lindsay (Talk | contribs)

 
Line 1: Line 1:
==Parent debate== ==Parent debate==
-*+*[[Debate:700 mile illegal immigration fence on the US Mexico border]]
==Supporting evidence== ==Supporting evidence==
*[http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/07/AR2006100700434.html According to a Washington Post article 10/07/06], Trafficking as an industry is thriving: The average price for being smuggled through a port of entry in the Tijuana-San Diego area - usually in the trunk of a car or using false or borrowed documents - has increased from $300 in 1994 to $2,500 in 2006. Crossing through the Arizona desert costs around $1,800. The article points out that this market value for facilitating crossings gives "coyotes" a strong incentive to keep illegal traffic flowing by innovating new and diverse methods for crossing. *[http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/07/AR2006100700434.html According to a Washington Post article 10/07/06], Trafficking as an industry is thriving: The average price for being smuggled through a port of entry in the Tijuana-San Diego area - usually in the trunk of a car or using false or borrowed documents - has increased from $300 in 1994 to $2,500 in 2006. Crossing through the Arizona desert costs around $1,800. The article points out that this market value for facilitating crossings gives "coyotes" a strong incentive to keep illegal traffic flowing by innovating new and diverse methods for crossing.

Current revision

Parent debate

Supporting evidence

  • According to a Washington Post article 10/07/06, Trafficking as an industry is thriving: The average price for being smuggled through a port of entry in the Tijuana-San Diego area - usually in the trunk of a car or using false or borrowed documents - has increased from $300 in 1994 to $2,500 in 2006. Crossing through the Arizona desert costs around $1,800. The article points out that this market value for facilitating crossings gives "coyotes" a strong incentive to keep illegal traffic flowing by innovating new and diverse methods for crossing.

Problem with the site? 

Tweet a bug on bugtwits
.