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Argument: "Under God" complies with separation of Church and State

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The Claremont Institute, a nonprofit organization whose mission is "to restore the principles of the American Founding to their rightful, preeminent authority...," posted the following position to its website (accessed Apr. 30, 2007): "The addition of the words 'under God' to the Pledge, and the school district's policy and practice of teacher-led recitation of the Pledge, do not violate the Establishment Clause... Indeed, the best evidence suggests just the opposite: The Establishment Clause was designed not just to prevent the establishment of a national church but to prohibit the federal government from interfering with state encouragement of religion as the states exercised their core police powers to protect the health, safety, welfare, and morals of the people. To hold that the Constitution prohibits the State or school district from allowing the recitation of a pledge that acknowledges the existence of God would ignore the history and intent of the First Amendment and would undermine the efforts of the States to foster the kind of moral virtue the Founders thought essential to the perpetuation of republican institutions."[http://undergod.procon.org/viewanswers.asp?questionID=1330] The Claremont Institute, a nonprofit organization whose mission is "to restore the principles of the American Founding to their rightful, preeminent authority...," posted the following position to its website (accessed Apr. 30, 2007): "The addition of the words 'under God' to the Pledge, and the school district's policy and practice of teacher-led recitation of the Pledge, do not violate the Establishment Clause... Indeed, the best evidence suggests just the opposite: The Establishment Clause was designed not just to prevent the establishment of a national church but to prohibit the federal government from interfering with state encouragement of religion as the states exercised their core police powers to protect the health, safety, welfare, and morals of the people. To hold that the Constitution prohibits the State or school district from allowing the recitation of a pledge that acknowledges the existence of God would ignore the history and intent of the First Amendment and would undermine the efforts of the States to foster the kind of moral virtue the Founders thought essential to the perpetuation of republican institutions."[http://undergod.procon.org/viewanswers.asp?questionID=1330]
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 +Barack Obama, JD, 44th President of the United States, made the following statements during his keynote address at the Call to Renewal conference held on June 28, 2006: "[A] sense of proportion should also guide those who police the boundaries between church and state. Not every mention of God in public is a breach to the wall of separation - context matters. It is doubtful that children reciting the Pledge of Allegiance feel oppressed or brainwashed as a consequence of muttering the phrase 'under God.' I didn't."

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William J. Federer, speaker, author, and president of Amerisearch, Inc., wrote the following in a 2003 amicus brief for the United States Supreme Court case Elk Grove Unified School District v. Michael A. Newdow: "It is not a violation of the Establishment Clause for our school children to acknowledge our religious heritage or to share in our religious identity by reciting the Pledge of Allegiance with the words, 'under God.' To the contrary, the public and patriotic affirmation of God is the best of our national traditions, dating back to Christopher Columbus, continuing with our Founding Fathers, and persisting today."[1]


The Claremont Institute, a nonprofit organization whose mission is "to restore the principles of the American Founding to their rightful, preeminent authority...," posted the following position to its website (accessed Apr. 30, 2007): "The addition of the words 'under God' to the Pledge, and the school district's policy and practice of teacher-led recitation of the Pledge, do not violate the Establishment Clause... Indeed, the best evidence suggests just the opposite: The Establishment Clause was designed not just to prevent the establishment of a national church but to prohibit the federal government from interfering with state encouragement of religion as the states exercised their core police powers to protect the health, safety, welfare, and morals of the people. To hold that the Constitution prohibits the State or school district from allowing the recitation of a pledge that acknowledges the existence of God would ignore the history and intent of the First Amendment and would undermine the efforts of the States to foster the kind of moral virtue the Founders thought essential to the perpetuation of republican institutions."[2]

Barack Obama, JD, 44th President of the United States, made the following statements during his keynote address at the Call to Renewal conference held on June 28, 2006: "[A] sense of proportion should also guide those who police the boundaries between church and state. Not every mention of God in public is a breach to the wall of separation - context matters. It is doubtful that children reciting the Pledge of Allegiance feel oppressed or brainwashed as a consequence of muttering the phrase 'under God.' I didn't."

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